Moodar Koodam (2013)
Movie: Moodar Koodam (U)
Cast: Naveen, Sentrayan, Oviya Helen, Rajaji, Anupama Kumar, Jayaprakash V, J Rmesh Tilak
Direction: Naveen
Producer: Pandiraj
Banner: Pasanga Productions
Music: Natarajan Sankaran
Genre: Comedy
Run Time: 141 Mins
Release Date : 13 Sep 2013

Moodar Koodam (2013)

User Score
6.2
(237 votes)
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Released under Director Pandiraj’s Pasanga Productions, Moodar Koodam marks the directorial and acting debut of Pandiraj’s former assistant Naveen. Moodar Koodam is a film with dark humor that attempts to trace the fine line between winners and losers.

Without a doubt the movie goers tend to compare this movie with negative shade comedy movies; Soodhu Kaavum, Pizza and Neram, even though unique in its own way. Without hero worship and a mainline actor to steer the movie, the plot unfolds its strength just based on the unfurling events out of a situation and how that ends up. Naveen, the director has also played as one of the lead stars and kudos to him for bringing out a movie in a quirky way.

Story:
The film features an ensemble cast that comprises the director himself, Rajaj, Sentrayan, Kuberan, Maheshwaran, Oviya, Sindhu Reddy, Anupama Kumar, Sathish Swaminathan, Jayaprakash and others.

The tagline in the opening credits of the film reads, ‘It’s better to travel well than to arrive’. This beautiful quote by Gautama Buddha forms the basis of Moodar Koodam.

Naveen (Naveen), Vellaisami (Rajaj), Sentrayan (Sentrayan) and Kuberan (Kuberan) meet in jail where they have been detained for minor offences.

All of them are released at the same time and after hearing each other’s unfortunate stories they decide that society definitely owes them something. They come up with a simple plan for a robbery, with the proceeds of which they plan to lead an honest life.

The house they decide to rob belongs to Vellaisami’s rich uncle, Bhaktavatsalan (Jayaprakash). Bhaktavatsalan started his chit fund company with money loaned by Vellaisami’s father. When Vellaisami asked his uncle for help, he was politely declined, hence the plan to rob him, which Vellaisami feels is totally justified as the money initially belonged to his father.

Just as Sentrayan is trying to pick the lock of the house they believe to be empty, the door is opened by the mistress of the house. A series of unforeseen incidents follow that the four are forced to handle.

Moodar Koodam (2013), 6.2 out of 10 based on 237 ratings

3 Comments

  1. Behindwoods
    September 16, 2013, 10:05 am

    Moodar Koodam is dark, different, serious, silly and an attempt which should be encouraged.

    First of all, kudos to Naveen and Pandiaraj to believe in a project like Moodar Koodam. Dark humor is a genre which should be wholeheartedly welcomed in Tamil in this era of new wave cinema.

    As a writer Naveen begins well with the character introductions and designs and for the most part he leaves the audience with a lingering thought in many scenes, attributed by the dialogues that he himself utters. Though designed to play on populism, the dialogues do manage to accomplish what it set out to do, garner claps.

    As a director, Naveen is able to extract what he wants for his story barring some of the hostage sequences that feel like stage dramas. The film has its best moments when the action moves outside the house, like the several backstories and the North Chennai episodes. The influence of Tarantino is highly evident in the way he purposefully inserts backstories at calculated moments in the narration – which are presented as short and refreshingly imaginative music videos. The pre-climax and the climax too seem like a ‘tribute’ to Guy Ritchie.

    Negative of Moodar Koodam is that as the story progresses indoors, Naveen loses his grip by having one too many redundant scenes. Impractical characters like the software engineer, Salim Bhai, Auto Kumar and Wakka from North Chennai also doesn’t help the movie maintain its momentum. Also, while the film had traces of adult humor it would have been bolder if the expletives hadn’t been sacrificed for the sake of the ‘U’ certification.

  2. Rediff
    September 16, 2013, 10:07 am

    Comedy and satire are beautifully interwoven, with excellent support from the cast

    There are no dull moments in director Naveen’s Moodar Koodam. But the sheer number of characters in the film makes one’s head spin.

    There are flashbacks for almost all the characters, which gives an insight into their past lives and also explains their present attitude. So it is really a surprise that the film doesn’t seem to go on forever.

    Editing by Athiyappan Siva is slick, everyone has been given equal importance, and the scenes are to the point and quickly move from one character to another.

    There are 14 music tracks in the film and the pick of the lot would definitely be Neeyum Bommai Naanum Bommai by legendary singer K J Yesudas. Incidentally, this was his first Tamil solo, originally recorded for the film Bommai (1964). It has been recorded once again by the singer for Moodar Koodam. It is beautiful number with thought-provoking lyrics and has been innovatively picturised as an autobiography of a doll.

    The title Moodar Koodam (Fools Gathering) is apt for the film. Every character with his eccentric personality traits tries his best to appear formidable, but invariably ends up looking like a fool and evokes laughter from the audience.

    Comedy and satire are beautifully interwoven in Moodar Koodam with excellent support from all the cast. The only negative in the film is the number of characters and incidents incorporated into the film, creating an overdose of everything.

  3. Sify
    September 16, 2013, 10:09 am

    Above Average

    There are too many characters confined to a house where a good part of the story takes place and scenes are long, hampering the narration. The black humour works to a certain extent, but there are irritating flashbacks that stick out like a sore thumb.

    All the lead characters are new faces and among the lot, Naveen as the hero and Sendrayan are ok, while the rest are wooden. In the supporting cast Jayaprakash, Anupama Kumar and Oviya prop up the film. The child artists in the film are terrific especially the little girl who attends Jayaprakash’s calls and tells that her mom and dad are having a bath together.

    On the whole it is a different film that should be applauded for swimming against the tide, though it works only in bits and pieces.

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